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Sip Through Decades of Daiquiris

Sip Through Decades of Daiquiris


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A new menu offers a half dozen variations of this classic cocktail

The daiquiri has developed a bad reputation as a sweet frozen drink characteristic of all-inclusive resorts, but there’s a history to this cocktail that dates back over a century. At its most basic, the daiquiri is three ingredients: rum, lime, and simple syrup.

It’s from that base that the bartenders at New York City’s Slowly Shirley launched the bar’s daiquiri menu available during National Rum Week from August 15 to 21. The subterranean bar highlights the origins of each cocktail on its menu, and the daiquiris are no different. Sip on a Hemingway-inspired cocktail from a recipe created at Havana’s La Floridita in 1921 or a modern Old Cuban from Pegu Club’s Audrey Saunders.

The elegance of the drinks matches the Old Hollywood-inspired interior. Think a hurricane glass wrapped in a banana leaf for the banana Fredo Corleone and a champagne coupe for the F.A.F., which is a powerful combination of five rums. (Don’t worry, there’s definitely still a frozen version.)

Find the F.A.F. recipe to make any week daiquiri week at home.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.


The Foolproof Daiquiri

Since there are only about a half-dozen true bartenders left in the world, with the rest barely capable of making anything other than vodka martinis, I decided that the only way I’d ever get a classic daiquiri, straight up, was to have the recipe printed on the back of my business card so I could hand it to the person behind the bar who might otherwise make it with strawberries or bananas, on the rocks or frozen.

Ever since I had the cards done, with a picture of the cocktail glass I want it served in, I’ve been getting exactly the daiquiri named after the Cuban town of Daiquiri, where, after the Spanish-American War, Americans came to run the mines, spending off-hours drinking local rum with local lime juice and local sugar.

F. Scott Fitzgerald was the first to mention it in print, in This Side of Paradise (1920), and Hemingway—who drank his daiquiris without sugar—wrote of the cocktail, “The frappéd part of the drink was like the wake of a ship and the clear part was the way the water looked when the bow cut it when you were in shallow water over marl bottom. That was almost the exact color.” A drink so perfect demands respect. And knowledge. So I have my cards.–John Mariani

LC One Man’s (Rather Pushy) Technique for Assuring the Perfect Drink Every Time Note

Just like John Mariani, you can have your cards, too. Just click on card below and print out the business card-size recipe on sturdy paper–something waterproof would perhaps be wise–then trim it to size and tuck it in your wallet.



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