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Parents Warned About Kids Snorting Smarties

Parents Warned About Kids Snorting Smarties


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School warns that kids might be snorting candy

Parents of Portsmouth middle schoolers received a panicked letter warning them their kids might be snorting candy.

Some parents in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, got a disturbing letter from their kids' school this week warning them that their children might be snorting Smarties.

According to Boing Boing, Portsmouth Middle School sent home a panicked letter warning parents that middle school kids might be crushing Smarties candy into powder and either snorting it through the nose or "smoking" it by taking a mouthful and exhaling it through the nose. The letter warned of many potential health dangers from snorting powdered candy, including a risk of nasal cuts from sharp candy pieces, a risk of allergic reaction if the student was allergic to sugar, and nasal maggots.

"Dr. Oren Friedman, a Mayo Clinic nose specialist, has cautioned that frequent snorting could even rarely lead to maggots feeding on the sugary dust wedged inside the nose," the letter warned. Local blogger John McDaid contacted Friedman, who clarified that nose maggots were a possibility when a person puts food in his or her nose, but he had never actually seen them as a result of Smartie snorting.

Stories about kids snorting Smarties and Pixie Sticks have been around the Internet since at least 2007, pointed out Mommyish, a parenting blog, which was not excessively worried about the new drug threat.

"I think we can all agree that nothing gets the Internet in a tizzy like the idea of kids shoving various substances up their noses, but the newest 'drug panic' is the most ridiculous yet," wrote Mommyish's Frances Locke, who pointed out that previous incarnations of the candy-snorting panic have involved stories of children supposedly snorting Crystal Light and aspartame.


Snorting Smarties Candies Craze Sweeping Middle School Kids, Parents Being Warned Of Dangers (VIDEO)

Snorting Smarties candies can cause dangerous infestations of nasal maggots worming in your noses, internal bleeding and lung infections. Parents in Rhode Island are especially being warned about this in concern with their children, UK MailOnline reported.

In an unusual trend which seeks to imitate cocaine users seen on television, nasal myiasis is a condition which occurs when flies lay larvae eggs inside the nose and are then attracted by the rotting candy rammed up inside the lining.

According to officials in Portsmouth Middle School, the trend is a "widespread phenomenon" that has been sweeping YouTube in recent years and has involved over a dozen students in the area, UK MailOnline reported.

If a tickling sensation is developed inside the children's noses and they start to smell a foul stench from inside their nasal passage, then parents need to be concerned.

According to UK MailOnline, "Symptoms of nasal maggots are sneezing and a gooey discharge that can lead to mucus emanating from the patient's eyelids - and in worse cases can lead to septicemia and serious infection."

Hundreds of clips pop up on a YouTube search where kids are seen crushing the beloved round candies into powder before sniffing them.

Dating back to 2007, the Smarties snorting trend in not a new phenomenon on YouTube.

Young boys are seen making lines of Smarties dust similar to cocaine and snorting the sugary powder through a rolled up dollar bill in one video posted in 2010.

As the residue fills their nasal passages and lungs, the clip, which has drawn more than 12,000 views, shows the kids coughing and gasping for air, UK MailOnline reported.

Lung infections, nose-wedged maggots, bleeding and nasal passage scarring, allergic reactions and even smoker's cough were some of the risks that parents at Portsmouth Middle School were warned about in an email from the administration on Thursday.

According to the letter made public by local blogger and parent John McDaid, kids who inhale crushed-up candies could be more susceptible to drug and nicotine addiction later in life compared to their peers.

By pouring the powdered sweets into their mouths and then exhaling through the nose, some kids prefer to "smoke" Smarties, UK MailOnline reported.

Made up of dextrose, citric acid, calcium stearate, flavoring and coloring agents, it is important to note that Smarties does not provide any high.

Rebecca Boss, of the Rhode Island Department of Behavioral Healthcare, told the station ABC6 that parents should always be on the lookout for changes in behavior in their children.

The Sun News reported that Portsmouth Middle School parents were alerted to the trend after 15 students at Frontier Middle School in Hamburg, N.Y., were discovered sniffing Smarties, according to Interim Superintendent of Schools Paul Hashem.

According to UK MailOnline, "The craze is not limited to the Northeast. In Atlanta, Ga., a 9-year-old boy has been suspended for allegedly inhaling Smarties dust through his nose."


Portsmouth Warns Parents of Students 'Snorting Smarties'

Portsmouth parents were warned in an e-mail Thursday about a new "snorting Smarties" scare at Portsmouth Middle School, reports local blog Hard Deadlines.

According to Hard Deadlines author John McDaid, who is also a Portsmouth parent, an employee of Portsmouth administration sent out an e-mail Thursday that warns of "a new trend among some of our middle school students - smoking or snorting the candy, Smarties."

McDaid is requesting information about who sent out the warning Thursday.

The e-mail from the Portsmouth School District, posted below, also warns that snorting Smarties candies "may lead to cigarette smoking or snorting of drugs."

The email is posted verbatim below.

A message from PORTSMOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL

Important Health Advisory for Parents Regarding the Candy, Smarties

We have recently become aware of an unsafe, new trend among some of our middle school students - smoking or snorting the candy, Smarties. Our research has taught us this is a widespread phenomenon and is the subject of many You-Tube videos.

To smoke Smarties, students crush the candies into a fine powder while it is still in its wrapper, tear off an end, pour the powder into their mouths and blow out the smoke. Some are able to put the powder into their mouths and blow it out their noses. Thus, they imitate a smoker's exhale.

  • Cuts- if the Smarties have not been finely crushed, pieces may act like razorblades cutting the tissue with which they come in contact.
  • Infection – sugar residue may remain in the nasal cavity, sinuses and/or lungs.This residue may lead to infections, cough, wheezing, and possible respiratory arrest.
  • Scarring of the nasal cavity – anything snorted can lead to scarring of the nasalpassages. Also if a piece of the Smartie becomes lodged in the nasal cavity it may need to be removed by a specialist.
  • Irritation of the lungs – smoking or snorting Smarties can lead to a smoker'scough which can cause laryngospasms causing the voice box to spasm or close.
  • Allergic reaction – if the child is allergic to sugar, snorting or smoking Smartiescan lead to an immediate allergic reaction.
  • Possible Maggots – Dr. Oren Friedman, a Mayo Clinic nose specialist, hascautioned that frequent snorting could even rarely lead to maggots feeding on the sugary dust wedged inside the nose.
  • Precursor to future cigarette smoking and drug use – although there is noaddictive piece to Smarties, the concern is this behavior may lead to cigarettesmoking or snorting of drugs.

This e-mail has been sent to you by PORTSMOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL. To maximize their communication with you, you may be receiving this e-mail in addition to a phone call with the same message. If you wish to discontinue this service, please inform PORTSMOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL either IN PERSON, by US MAIL, or by TELEPHONE at 401-849-3700.


Portsmouth Warns Parents of Students 'Snorting Smarties'

Portsmouth parents were warned in an e-mail Thursday about a new "snorting Smarties" scare at Portsmouth Middle School, reports local blog Hard Deadlines.

According to Hard Deadlines author John McDaid, who is also a Portsmouth parent, an employee of Portsmouth administration sent out an e-mail Thursday that warns of "a new trend among some of our middle school students - smoking or snorting the candy, Smarties."

McDaid is requesting information about who sent out the warning Thursday.

The e-mail from the Portsmouth School District, posted below, also warns that snorting Smarties candies "may lead to cigarette smoking or snorting of drugs."

The email is posted verbatim below.

A message from PORTSMOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL

Important Health Advisory for Parents Regarding the Candy, Smarties

We have recently become aware of an unsafe, new trend among some of our middle school students - smoking or snorting the candy, Smarties. Our research has taught us this is a widespread phenomenon and is the subject of many You-Tube videos.

To smoke Smarties, students crush the candies into a fine powder while it is still in its wrapper, tear off an end, pour the powder into their mouths and blow out the smoke. Some are able to put the powder into their mouths and blow it out their noses. Thus, they imitate a smoker's exhale.

  • Cuts- if the Smarties have not been finely crushed, pieces may act like razorblades cutting the tissue with which they come in contact.
  • Infection – sugar residue may remain in the nasal cavity, sinuses and/or lungs.This residue may lead to infections, cough, wheezing, and possible respiratory arrest.
  • Scarring of the nasal cavity – anything snorted can lead to scarring of the nasalpassages. Also if a piece of the Smartie becomes lodged in the nasal cavity it may need to be removed by a specialist.
  • Irritation of the lungs – smoking or snorting Smarties can lead to a smoker'scough which can cause laryngospasms causing the voice box to spasm or close.
  • Allergic reaction – if the child is allergic to sugar, snorting or smoking Smartiescan lead to an immediate allergic reaction.
  • Possible Maggots – Dr. Oren Friedman, a Mayo Clinic nose specialist, hascautioned that frequent snorting could even rarely lead to maggots feeding on the sugary dust wedged inside the nose.
  • Precursor to future cigarette smoking and drug use – although there is noaddictive piece to Smarties, the concern is this behavior may lead to cigarettesmoking or snorting of drugs.

This e-mail has been sent to you by PORTSMOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL. To maximize their communication with you, you may be receiving this e-mail in addition to a phone call with the same message. If you wish to discontinue this service, please inform PORTSMOUTH MIDDLE SCHOOL either IN PERSON, by US MAIL, or by TELEPHONE at 401-849-3700.


Snorting Smarties a trend in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, parents warned

Instead of eating them, kids are snorting them. It's something happening across the nation. Videos on YouTube show kids crushing the candy and inhaling it. The bizarre trend is happening at Portsmouth Middle School. Parents received an email alert this week not knowing whether to laugh or be worried about how harmful it can be to their children's health.

As soon as the principal at Portsmouth Middle School found out it was happening with his students, he said he immediately sent an email to parents.

"Well, I got the email last night and I was pretty amazed, never heard of such a thing," said one parent. "Actually I thought it was a little bit amusing."

Parents said they weren't sure how to react to the peculiar pastime.

"As I read more into it and I found out it's on YouTube, it is actually quite concerning," said another parent.

"They laugh about it, they say that they've heard of kids doing it, but they don't imply that it's a big problem or that it's something that a lot of people do," said parent Bruce Digennaro.

The motivation behind the crushing and snorting of the Smarties isn't immediately known. But the harmful effects are real.

"Any time you snort or inhale a substance into your lungs that Is not meant to be, it is definitely hazardous to your health and could have significant health consequences for individuals," said Rebecca Boss, Behavioral Health Care.

Portsmouth's principal said the Smarties snorting wasn't a huge problem, but certainly one parents should be aware of.

"Where do they get these ideas, you know? Can they harm themselves, you know? What will it lead to? They are all concerns obviously," said Adrian Markey, parent.

Boss, an administrator with Rhode Island's Behavior Healthcare Department, says parents should always look for unusual behavior in their children, and search text messages as well.

"Any changes in behavior is definitely an indication that the child is doing something they may not want the parent to know about," she said.

Some of the negative side effects of snorting Smarties include infection and scarring of the nasal cavity.


School warns parents of Smarties snorting trend

PORTSMOUTH, R.I. – The candy “Smarties” may be a tasty treat, but many schools are warning parents about a new trend that involves students snorting them.

Parents of Portsmouth Middle School students received a note from school officials on Thursday, warning them of the new trend.

School officials said the new trend is a ‘widespread phenomenon’ that’s found on popular YouTube videos.

According to WPRI, the note sent to parents via email explains the methods in which students have been ingesting the sugary candy.

Some students have been smoking or snorting the candy, by using a straw or a rolled up paper to put the crushed candy powder up into their nasal cavities.

Officials warned parents of the resulting medical issues of snorting the candy.

Some effects include nasal scarring, infection, lung irritation, allergic reaction or possible maggots.


Most Read

And last year, 15 children at a Hamburg, N.Y., middle school were caught snorting the drug, prompting a warning from school officials to parents.

A 9-year-old Georgia boy was even suspended from school after being caught in the action, which officials worry glorifies the inhalation of drugs like cocaine, heroin or smashed up prescription pills, The Sun News reported.

"If the Smarties do end up getting into the lung, then that can also cause infection," Erie County Health Commissioner Dr. Gail Burstein told the newspaper. "It is an irritant it can cause wheezing and maybe chronic cough and asthma and sinus complications. And, ultimately, if someone is allergic to sugar or the contents of Smarties, then they could end up having an anaphylactic reaction and dying."


Snorting Smarties And Other Strange Ways Kids Get “High”

According to officials at the Portsmouth Middle School in Rhode Island, the newest way for kids to get “high” is by snorting Smarties candies. Children and teens are grinding the candies up into a powder and then making a line with the powder, similar to how cocaine users line up their drugs. The kids then snort the Smarties into their noses. While the Smarties do not contain any addicting ingredients and the kids are not actually getting high, the phenomena seems to be becoming very popular.

Doctors warn that the side effects of snorting Smarties can include lung infections, nose-wedged maggots, bleeding and nasal passage scarring, allergic reactions and smoker’s cough. School officials in Rhode Island and at many other schools, have warned parents to watch for signs that their children may be snorting Smarties.

Smarties aren’t the first strange thing that children and teens have tried to snort, drink or smoke in order to get “high.” Here are a few others that might just shock you.

Alcohol Tampons
Teenagers are soaking tampons in vodka and other alcohol products and inserting them into their bodies in order to get drunk. Many teenagers are doing this before going to school so they can feel drunk in class without actually drinking the alcohol and getting caught.

Nutmeg
You have probably used Nutmeg as a spice in your pumpkin pie or maybe even your chili, but some kids are using it to get high. If consumed in large amounts, Nutmeg can lead to hallucinations and a buzz. Kids and teenagers are snorting the spice and even eating it to feel a nutmeg buzz.

Catnip
Catnip can make your cat seem crazy and hyper and it can do the same to your kid. Teenagers are adding catnip to tobacco and smoking it. The mixture of the two plants gives the smoker a euphoric feeling.

Bath Salts
Teenagers and children are inhaling actual bath salts as a way to get high. While the bath salts have been known to cause hallucinations, they can also cause high blood pressure, lung problems and even death.

You never know what teenagers and children will try in order to try to catch a buzz or feel high. Do you think snorting Smarties is a serious concern and what other strange ways to get high are you aware of?


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Parents Warned About Kids Snorting Smarties - Recipes

From http://www.dailymail.co.uk By Snejana Farberov, 19 January 2014

Parents in Rhode Island are being warned that their children could succumb to horrifying infestations of nasal maggots worming in their noses, internal bleeding and lung infections if they continue snorting Smarties candies.

Scary trend: YouTube is filled with videos showing children sniffing lines of Smarties powder through rolled up dollar bills and straws

According to officials in Portsmouth Middle School, the trend is a ‘widespread phenomenon’ that has been sweeping YouTube in recent years and has involved over a dozen students in the area.

Parents have been warned to watch their children to see if they develop a tickling sensation inside their noses and ask them if they begin to smell a foul stench from inside their nasal passage.

Symptoms of nasal maggots are sneezing and a gooey discharge that can lead to mucus emanating from the patient’s eyelids – and in worse cases can lead to septicemia and serious infection.

A search of the YouTube has revealed hundreds of clips where kids are seen crushing the beloved round candies into powder before sniffing them.

The Smarties snorting trend is by no means a new phenomenon some of the YouTube videos date back to at least 2007.


The New Trend All The Cool Kids Are Doing: Snorting Smarties

Kids snorting Smarties isn’t on the level of vodka-soaked tampons, but it does give outraged parents an excuse to say, “Don’t be a dumb-dumb, don’t snort Smarties,” so it’s a real, DEADLY trend. Feel the paranoia.

Officials at a Portsmouth Middle School in Rhode Island warned parents last week that they recently became aware of a trend where students were crushing the classic candies into a “fine powder” while still in the wrapper, then either putting the powder in their mouths and exhaling it through the mouth or nose like cigarette smoke, or using a straw or rolled up piece of paper to snort the powder as if it were cocaine.

“We have recently become aware of an unsafe, new trend among some of our middle school students — smoking or snorting the candy, Smarties. Our research has taught us this is a widespread phenomenon and is the subject of many You-Tube videos,” read the email addressed from Portsmouth Middle School. (Via)

“Research” = five-second Google search.

The email went on to provide a bulleted list of potential health risks associated with the practice: cuts, infection, scarring of the nasal cavity, irritation of the lungs, allergic reaction and raised risk for turning to other substances like cigarettes or drugs that can be snorted. One eyebrow-raising health risk the letter pointed to was increased odds for possible maggot infestation in the nose. The email cited the Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Oren Friedman, who purportedly said maggots may feed on the sugary dust wedged inside the nose. (Via)

Back in my day, we snorted Sugar-Coated Discs, none of this fancy name brand candy. Dem kids deserve dem maggots.


Watch the video: snorting smarties (May 2022).